Inside the Film & Media Archive – Film Winding

21 Jun

When a Film Archive receives a collection it may have been stored in less-than-ideal conditions. The storage cans might be rusty and the film might be on projection reels. A projection reel is not ideal for long-term storage so one of the first steps in handling film is to remove it from decaying cans and wind it onto an archival film core. The newly wound film will then be placed in a polypropylene can to protect the film. When a film is wound on a core, it should be wound with an even tension and the edges of the film should be even.

Here, Irene Taylor, Film and Media Cataloging and Preservation Archivist, handles a film from the Harry Wald Collection. The film is removed from its rusty storage can, wound off the projection reel onto a film core. The last photo shows the end result with an evenly wound film ready to go into its new can. The Film Preservation Guide published by the National Film Preservation Foundation has detailed information on how to handle, wind, and inspect film.

Irene Taylor, Film and Media Cataloging and Preservation Archivist. Photos by Alison Carrick.

Irene Taylor, Film and Media Cataloging and Preservation Archivist winds a print from the Harry Wald Collection onto a new film core. Photos by Alison Carrick.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: