Tag Archives: Ford Madox Ford

The National Film Preservation Foundation

26 Apr
The Two Orphans (1911), Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research.

The Two Orphans (1911), Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research.

The National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF) is a great resource for information about film preservation and news on the latest developments in the field. The National Film Preservation Foundation was created by the U.S. Congress in 1997 as an nonprofit organization to help save films which would by unlikely to survive without public support. They have developed grant programs to enable film archives across the county to preserve films that might otherwise be lost.

The Film & Media Archive was a recepient of a grant from the NFPF last year and preserved the only known footage of noted writer and critic Ford Madox Ford. The film, George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford, is now preserved and access copies can be viewed at the archive.

The NFPF’s website is a great place to learn more about film preservation and find resources, guides, and examples of perserved films:

All in all, it’s a great place to start learning about film preservation and exploring lost, unknown, and recovered films.

Image from George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford

Image from George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford

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Ford Madox Ford and “Parade’s End”

28 Feb
Image from George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford

Image from George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford

This past fall the Film & Media Archive screened a recently preserved home movie featuring the only known footage of modernist writer, critic, and editor, Ford Madox Ford. As the only known footage of Mr. Ford in existence, this rare portrait preserves the legacy of one of the most prolific writers of modernist literature.

Washington University’s Film & Media Archive was able to preserve this rare footage with a grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF). The George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford is a 16mm film consisting of images of Mr. Ford enjoying an afternoon with family members and friends on the grounds of  Mr. Keating’s home in Plainfield, New Jersey, circa 1929.

Ford Madox Ford’s work is being introduced to a modern audience with the HBO miniseries, Parade’s End. Adapted by Tom Stoppard and starring  Benedict Cumberbatch and Rebecca Hall the series is getting rave reviews. The four related novels that make up Parade’s End were published between 1924 and 1928. The novels were combined into one work which was listed at number 57 on the Modern Library‘s 100 Best Novels list. Literary critic, Mary Gordon noted that it was “quite simply, the best fictional treatment of war in the history of the novel.”

Ford’s treatment of World War I was not a straightforward linear re-telling of events. As a modernist novel the story is filtered through the consciousness of its protagonist, Christopher Tietjens, and the war is a major event in his and others’ lives but not the only one. Continuing in a modernist vein, the last volume in the series explores shifting points of view and perspectives through a series of monologues by characters other than Tietjens. This last volume was left out of the Bodley Head edition edited by Graham Greene, but has been restored to later editions.

In Mary Gordon’s book review of Parade’s End, Volume II: No More Parades: A Novel, she write of how Ford was influenced by Impressionist art and how he sought to replicate that in his writing,

Over and over, he uses the technique of the Impressionist, which he articulated in several critical essays. “I suppose,” he says in an essay on Impressionism, “that Impressionism exists to render those queer effects of real life that are like so many views seen through bright glass—through glass so bright that whilst you perceive through it a landscape or a backyard, you are aware that, on its surface, it reflects a face of a person behind you. For the whole of life is really like that; we are almost always in one place with our minds somewhere quite other.” The ideal Impressionist work, he asserts “would attain to the sort of odd vibration that scenes in real life really have; you would give your reader the impression that he was witnessing something real, that he was passing through an experience.” (Ford “On Impressionism” in Martin Stanndard’s Norton Critical Edition of The Good Soldier, 263-64).

Mary Gordon, Parade’s End, Volume II: No More Parades: A Novel

Parade’s End an HBO miniseries can be viewed on HBO this week. For more information on showtimes, check HBO’s website. For more information on Ford Madox Ford material in the Special Collections at Washington University, please contact the Film & Media Archive or the Manuscripts Unit which also holds a collection of Mr. Ford’s papers, including drafts, galleys and correspondence.

Home Movie Day in St. Louis, October 20, 2012

12 Oct

Come join us for Home Movie Day in St. Louis!

Saturday, October 20, 2012

West Campus Conference Center

Noon- 3 pm

Washington University Film & Media Archive hosts the annual Home Movie Day, an international event that invites the public to share their Regular 8mm, Super 8mm, 16mm, VHS and DVD home movies. In addition to screening home movies, the event provides an opportunity to learn how to care for home movies.

Home Movie Day in St. Louis is a free event and will be held at the West Campus Conference Center from noon to 3 pm on Saturday, October 20, 2012.

This year we are proud to debut a recently preserved film featuring the only known footage of the influential writer, editor, and critic, Ford Madox Ford. Washington University’s Film & Media Archive was recently awarded a National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF) grant to preserve the George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford. This 16mm film consists of images of Mr. Ford enjoying an afternoon with family members and friends on the grounds of Mr. Keating’s home in Plainfield, New Jersey, circa 1929. As the only known footage of Mr. Ford in existence, this rare portrait preserves the legacy of one of the most prolific writers of modernist literature.

George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford

George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford

In addition to this rare find, and a program of films from the Film & Media Archive’s Collection, we will be screening participants home movies. Home Movie Day is an annual international event that was started ten years ago by a group of film archivists who were concerned about the fate and condition of the home movies of the 20th century. As technology changed people began to get their films transferred to VHS and DVD, and sometimes discarded the original films. Participants of Home Movie Day can watch these unique, irreplaceable films and learn about how to care and preserve their 8mm, Super 8mm, and 16mm films. As the Home Movie Day site states,

Original films (and the equipment required to view them) can long outlast any version on VHS tape, DVDs, or other digital media. Not only that, but contrary to the stereotype of the faded, scratched, and shaky home movie image, the original films are often carefully shot in beautiful, vibrant color—which may not be captured in a lower-resolution video transfer.

Contact the Film & Media Archive (wufilmarchives@wumail.wustl.edu or 314-935-8679) for information about including your home movies in the program.

National Film Preservation Foundation Grant

14 Jun
George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford

George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford

Washington University’s Film & Media Archive has been awarded a National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF) grant to preserve the only known footage of the influential writer, editor, and critic, Ford Madox Ford.

Ford Madox Ford was one of the most prolific writers and literary critics of the 20th century. He is well-known for his personal and professional associations with legendary writers, such as Joseph Conrad (with whom he collaborated on three novels), Ernest Hemingway, Henry James, Thomas Hardy, H.G. Wells, James Joyce and Ezra Pound, among others. His 1915 novel, The Good Soldier, is often cited by critics as a masterpiece. For example, it is listed in Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels and The Observer included it in their 100 Greatest Novels of All Time.

Ford lived in Paris in the 1920s and in addition to being a writer published an influential journal, The Transatlantic Review. He published numerous writers who would go on to great acclaim including Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Jean Rhys, and many others. As a writer, Ford used innovative narrative techniques including intricate flashbacks and shifting of time, especially in his acclaimed novel, The Good Soldier.

The George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford consists of images of Mr. Ford enjoying an afternoon with family members and friends on the grounds of Mr. Keating’s home in Plainfield, New Jersey, circa 1929. As the only known footage of Mr. Ford in existence, this rare portrait preserves the legacy of one of the most prolific writers of modernist literature.

The Modern Literature/Manuscripts unit of Washington University Libraries Department of Special Collections also holds a collection of Mr. Ford’s papers, including drafts, galleys and correspondence. The preservation and accessibility of the George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford will complement these materials as researchers are provided with a more complete representation of Mr. Ford. Without preservation of this film, Mr. Ford only lives on through text-based resources.

The Film & Media Archive will screen the newly preserved film at the 2012 Home Movie Day event. In addition, the film will be screened at an event co-sponsored by the Modern Literature/Manuscripts unit of Special Collections. Scheduled for spring 2013, this event will showcase the film as well as the other Ford materials held by the university. In conjunction with this event, a digital exhibition will be made freely available via the web.  Like all Special Collections events, these events will be free and open to the public.

For a full list of the grants, see the National Film Preservation Foundation’s press release.